Thunderbrook UlsaGon

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The horse?s foregut consists of the stomach and the small intestine. The stomach is about the size of a black water bucket in a large horse, but the functional size is about that of a rugby ball, so as a rule of thumb, never feed meals any larger in volume than a rugby ball! The stomach contents are made acidic by the hydrochloric acid produced by stomach cells lining the stomach wall. This acidic juice helps to sterile food and begins the breakdown of fats and proteins. The stomach empties its contents about every 12 to 15 mins, passing through the pyloric sphincture into the first part of the small intestine, called the duodenum. Horses can very easily develop ulcers in the stomach (gastric ulcers) and the small intestine, especially the duodenum (duodenal ulcers) where the acidic stomach juices flow out.

Horses that may benefit from UlsaGon include those that display (not all but some of) these behaviours:

* Are sensitive to being girthed up and the saddle put on,
* Chew wood, lead ropes or eat soil
* Avoid the bit with head placement pointing nose upwards
* Grumpy to the touch around the girth area, behind elbows, and between the front legs on the chest
* Reluctance to pick up hind feet, or snatchy movement to hold feet up tight to belly
* Stressy behaviour, nervous and jumpy
* Poor doers or tucked up appearance